Category Archives: vegan products

Mini Moos

Recipe: take 3 packs of moo free mini moos three packs and arrange like so, in sunshine or rain.

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EAT!

Our favourite was the bunny comb, the little pieces of crunchie-esque candy are delightful (side note: we have a recipe for crunchies here). The sultana ones were reminiscent of Cadbury’s fruit and nut (been a long time but we recall) and the originals are smooth, mild and gorgeous, as moo free chocolate always is.

Available from: Goodness Direct, Amazon.co.uk and many other places as detailed here

Also check out the competition on the moo free website to win chocolate goodies including those above 🙂 Closing date July 30th 2012.

gluten free broccoli and sweetcorn quiche

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This is a dish we enjoy so much we’ve had it twice in the last week. Using Orgran’s pastry mix instead of flour, it really is delicious.

I mainly ignored the packet instructions and just made the pastry how I normally do, probably using a bit more fat (Pure marg) and water than recommended. One pack makes enough pastry for two 10 inch quiches. Roll out to fit your greased dishes.

For the tofu topping (again I am listing amounts for two family size pies, adjust as required) blend two packs of silken tofu with a little black salt (Kala Namak), several sprigs of fresh rosemary and a half teaspoon of turmeric and then mix in a tin of drained sweetcorn. Place a par boiled, sliced head of broccoli evenly over the pastry bases and pour the tofu mix over. Top with sliced tomatoes and bake at 200C for half to three quarters of an hour.

On a sidenote, I bought the silken tofu from Approved Food, in date, for 50p a pack, making it much more affordable than usual. It’s probably not in stock now, stuff like that sells out fast, but it’s worth checking for vegan goodies regularly.

Current read, because lets face it, I’m unlikely to write another post devoted to books anytime soon: The Death of Eli Gold, it’s very good.

moo free Easter egg

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Open the box and it hits you: that exciting, sugary Easter Egg scent from childhood. I don’t know why chocolate should smell different when formed into an egg shape, but it does.  Dark chocolate eggs are of course gorgeous, but altogether more grown up. This is the one for children and those who don’t like high cocoa content chocolate. The moo free egg is sweet and mild and could easily be mistaken for a milk chocolate product.

It’s a good 100g size and the bunny, butterfly and flower packaging is a nice change from dark eggs which are usually aimed at very mature people…

Available from Amazon.co.uk and larger Waitrose stores. Moo Free Chocolates have full details of all stockists on their website

See Vegan Easter for our full updated listings.

gourmet raw brownies and crisps

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But first to the crisps: completely guilt free, dried raw squares of tastiness. The three flavours are Beetroot, Spicy Thai and Red Pepper and they’re all very good…

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…but the absolute winner for us was the red pepper. Reminiscent of pizza, these would be very nice little crackers too. Topped with a small slice of tomato, a basil leaf and maybe half an olive… but before these musings could be made real and captured on camera they were all scoffed by other people.

The brownies are satisfyingly sticky, soft and rich, remarkably like a cooked cake but you still feel great after eating them. No sugar rush/up/down thing going on at all.

And just look at this cacao mint brownie coming towards you:

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Excuse the food porn 🙂 Other varieties are cacoa cashew which is pleasantly cinnamony, carob hazelnut and carob orange. The carob ones are nice, they got gobbled down fast, but chocolate is always preferred here.

All these delicious, healthy products are raw, organic, vegan and free from wheat and gluten 😀 You can read more about them and purchase on  Gourmet Raw’s website Use code GR003 for a 10% discount.

cream of tomato soup and a cheese and onion pasty

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Ingredients:
2 tins of plum tomatoes
about a cup of water (rinse out tins with it)
1 onion
5 cloves of garlic
2 medium sweet potatoes, peeled and chopped
1 or 2 handfuls of cashew nuts
seasalt to taste

Place the tomatoes and water in a pan and bring to the boil, adding the onion, sweet potato and garlic as it heats. Once it boils, turn down to a simmer for 10-15 minutes, until potatoes are soft. Place soup in a blender and add the cashew nuts. Blend and taste for seasoning, add salt as desired.

If your blender is not very strong, try soaking the cashews in water overnight to soften them before using.

Pasty made in a very similar manner to the basic pasties on frugal but using Kamut flour in the pastry and filled with chopped red onion, cubed potatoes and cheezly, all cooked in a little soya milk first, also very good 🙂

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Scottish macaroons

If you’re looking for a Scottish dish to make for Burns night other than haggis*, these are very good – nothing like the English item of the same name and containing the somewhat surprising ingredient of potato (undetectable, is lovely fondant).

Basically you boil a small peeled potato, mash it and mix in as much icing sugar as it can take, which will be a lot. Roll out the fondant, cut into rectangles and leave to dry out for a few hours. Coat in melted chocolate, dip in dessicated coconut, toasted or not, and let set. There is a more detailed write up by Cat over on Modern Housewife

*note: do not serve the macaroons with neeps and tatties 😉

Scottish coconut macaroons

a casserole and a cookbook

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We will have been married 20 years this year… which causes me to reflect how far we’ve come, how much the world has changed in that time and to note the two items above. They were given to us as a wedding present by friends who I used to babysit for and here they are still with us, I don’t think any other dish we own has survived that long! The Cranks Recipe Book sparked my interest at once, as I had eaten in their restaurant in London while a student, and it called to mind lovely brick walls and earthenware plates of hearty soup (they now have one restaurant in Devon).

It really taught me to cook, being the only cookery title I had at the time (bit of a change there then) in our first flat that we loved so much. I was fairly clueless when it came to the culinary arts. I remember phoning my mum at times with questions such as ‘how do you cook a neep? I can’t even seem to cut it up’. With the book I learned to bake bread, make cakes and the wonderfully frugal crecy plate pie, prepare soups and casseroles got put in the dish 🙂 It influenced me in more subtle ways too. Being the one and only it got thoroughly read and I absorbed the health oriented nature of the pages, reading for example, how much adding fresh herbs enhanced the nutritional value of the food. I remember the excitement of planting up a small herb garden and reading more deeply into these subjects. Looking at it now I notice all the cheesy recipes but you could just use any one of the many vegan cheeses available now or leave it out altogether.

Bit different when we first went vegan – a vegan cookbook obtained from the library that shall remain nameless (mainly as I can’t remember it’s name, I think it was somewhat generic, but also I do not want to slander it as it may have had other redeeming recipes) was responsible for me making a vegan cheese out of marg and yeast extract 13 years ago – absolutely disgusting, totally foul!!

So, my cranks book, heavily marked with food, water and childrens crayons. It is now available in a swanky new asparagus covered edition but you can still pick up the original for a penny 😀

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As for the dish, it still gets used though not as much anymore. The odd apple/rhubarb crumble is popped in it. I now favour my big Le Creuset that you can cook on the hob and in the oven with – very handy for making a sheperdess/red dragon pie base in and just putting mashed tatties on top and then into the oven it goes. I am very lucky to also have two similar cast iron AGA pans/casseroles given to us by another friend who had them sitting unwanted and unused in his garage, and these are my 3 usual dinner cooking pans now.

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We’ve always been blessed with friendship 🙂 I am currently reading Walking to Greenham sent to me by a wonderful woman and friend… a fascinating book and I find myself contemplating the larger worldwide changing of the times. What will the next 20 years bring?